CIO Today

CIO Today Network Sites:   Top Tech News  |   CIO Today   |   Mobile Tech Today   |   Data Storage Today
Daily Briefing for Technology's Top Decision-Makers
Thursday, April 24th 
24/7/365 Network Uptime!
This ad will display for the next 20 seconds. Please click for more information, or scroll down to pass the ad, or Close Ad.
Trending Topics:   Security Heartbleed Big Data Cloud Computing Windows XP Data Centers OS X Mavericks
Home
Enterprise Software
Enterprise Hardware
Big Data
Network Security
Cloud Computing
CRM Systems
Data Storage
Operating Systems
Communications
CIO Issues
Mobile Tech
Chips & Processors
World Wide Web
Business Briefing
After Hours
Press Releases
 
Free Newsletters
Top CIO News
 
Mobile Tech Today
 

After Hours

Will EU Privacy Decision Help U.S. Downloaders?

Will EU Privacy Decision Help U.S. Downloaders?
January 30, 2008 2:17PM

Bookmark and Share
The decision by the European Court of Justice allows telecoms to protect the names of file sharers in civil cases and appears to deal a blow to the music industry's efforts to protect copyrights. Observers hope the EU decision will set an example for U.S. lawmakers to protect the privacy of music file sharers.

Neustar, Inc. (NYSE: NSR) is a trusted, neutral provider of real-time information and analysis to the Internet, telecommunications, information services, financial services, retail, media and advertising sectors. Neustar applies its advanced, secure technologies in location, identification, and evaluation to help its customers promote and protect their businesses. More information is available at www.neustar.biz.

A significant privacy decision by the European Court of Justice is focusing renewed attention on U.S. copyright enforcement efforts, particularly the aggressive efforts of the Recording Industry Association of America to identify peer-to-peer users.

A Spanish recording-rights group, Promusicae, sued a European telecommunications firm, Telefnica, over its refusal to turn over the names of individuals that Promusicae believed were illegally swapping protected music. On Tuesday, the court ruled in favor of Telefnica and held that European law "does not require member states to lay down an obligation to disclose personal data in the context of civil proceedings."

However, the court added, individual members of the European Union can pass their own legislation imposing a requirement on companies within their borders to turn over such information when copyright infringement is suspected. In doing so, however, the court warned that member states should make sure their laws comply with the directives of the EU and that they do not conflict with either fundamental rights or the general principles of EU law.

Unanswered Questions

Marc Rotenberg, executive director of the Electronic Privacy Information Center, characterized the court's decision as a "very important development." He cautioned, however, that the precise impact of the court's ruling may not be immediately known.

"Because of the overlapping nature of EU directives and the principle of subsidiarity which tends to decentralize authority within the European Union," Rotenberg said, "it can be a little difficult to interpret decisions of the European Court of Justice. But we believe this is a clear statement about the need to safeguard privacy for Internet users and to make clear that there is no obligation in European community law to require retention or disclosure of records concerning those who may have violated copyright law."

Not surprisingly, representatives of the music industry offered a different spin on the court's decision. John Kennedy, chairman and CEO of IFPI, an international music rights group, said the court's decision underscored the need for tools to fight online piracy.

"The judgment," Kennedy said, "means that music-rights owners can still take actions to enforce their civil rights, and it has sent out a clear signal that [European countries] have to get the right balance between privacy and enforcement of intellectual property rights and that intellectual property rights can neither be ignored nor neglected."

Impact on the United States?

Despite the fact that the Internet is a global resource, the court decision does not have any direct effect on U.S. privacy or copyright laws. But Rotenberg hopes it will serve as an example for American lawmakers.

"The European Union has generally done a better job than the United States incorporating privacy interests into emerging legal questions," Rotenberg said, "in part because there is a stronger fundamental right -- Article 8 -- and clearer framework legislation -- the EU Data Protection Directive."

Tell Us What You Think
Comment:

Name:



 After Hours
1. Samsung Gear Fit Geared for Exercise
2. Google Sharpens Contact Lens Vision
3. Aereo CEO Speaks Out on Future
4. Project Ara Phone Version Ahead
5. Beware: Facebook Shares Your Locale




 Most Popular Articles
1. BlackBerry Drops T-Mobile After Nasty Spat
2. Cisco, IBM Launch Internet of Things Consortium
3. Salesforce CRM Gets Industry Specific for Internet of Customers
4. Intel Bets on Cloudera for Big Data Analytics
5. SAP HANA Data Warehouse App Gets Faster Analytics

Have an informed opinion on this story?
Send a Letter to the Editor.
We want to know what you think.
Send us your Feedback.

 Related Topics  Latest News & Special Reports

  Google Maps, Now with Time Travel
  Lessons from Verizon's Threat Report
  NYPD Twitter Campaign Backfires
  Net Gets Faster, But Easier to Attack
  OnePlus One Boasts Android Weapon

 Technology Marketplace
Business Intelligence
Get real-time, cloud-based information services with Neustar.
 
Cloud Computing
Next Generation Data Center Is Here! Vblock™ Systems from VCE
 
Contact Centers
HP delivers the future of the contact center with HP Qfiniti 10.
 
Data Storage
Next Generation Data Center Is Here! Vblock™ Systems from VCE
Barium Ferrite (BaFe) is the future of tape.
2.5" Enterprise-class SATA & SAS SSDs for server & storage applications
 
Enterprise Hardware
Barium Ferrite (BaFe) is the future of tape.
2.5" Enterprise-class SATA & SAS SSDs for server & storage applications
 
Hardware
Protect your network with APC Smart-UPS battery backup
 
Network Security
Protect your network with APC Smart-UPS battery backup
 

Network Security Spotlight
What Verizon's Data Breach Report Can Teach Enterprises
It’s probably not a jaw-dropper, but cyberespionage is officially on the rise. And the use of stolen or misused credentials is still the leading way the bad guys gain access to corporate information.
 
Top Cyberthreats Exposed by Verizon Report
Beyond Heartbleed, there are cyberthreats vying to take down enterprise networks, corrupt smartphones, and wreak havoc on businesses. Verizon is exposing these threats in a new report.
 
Where Do Web Sites Stand, Post-Heartbleed?
A security firm says the vast majority of Web sites have patched themselves to protect against the Heartbleed bug, but now there are questions raised on the reliability of open-source programs.
 
Navigation
CIO Today
Home/Top News | Enterprise Software | Enterprise Hardware | Big Data | Network Security | Cloud Computing | CRM Systems
Data Storage | Operating Systems | Communications | CIO Issues | Mobile Tech | Chips & Processors | World Wide Web
Business Briefing | After Hours | Press Releases
Also visit these Enterprise Technology Sites
Top Tech News | CIO Today | Mobile Tech Today | Data Storage Today

Services:
FreeNewsFeed | Free Newsletters | XML/RSS Feed

About CIO Today Network | How To Contact Us | Article Reprints | Services for PR Pros (In partnership with NewsFactor) | Top Tech Wire | How To Advertise

Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
© Copyright 2000-2014 CIO Today. All rights reserved. Article rating technology by Blogowogo. Member of Accuserve Ad Network.