CIO Today

CIO Today Network Sites:   Top Tech News  |   CIO Today   |   Mobile Tech Today   |   Data Storage Today
Daily Briefing for Technology's Top Decision-Makers
Sunday, April 20th 
Real-time info services with Neustar
Trending Topics:   Security Heartbleed Big Data Cloud Computing Windows XP Data Centers OS X Mavericks
Home
Enterprise Software
Enterprise Hardware
Big Data
Network Security
Cloud Computing
CRM Systems
Data Storage
Operating Systems
Communications
CIO Issues
Mobile Tech
Chips & Processors
World Wide Web
Business Briefing
After Hours
Press Releases
 
Free Newsletters
Top CIO News
 
Mobile Tech Today
 

World Wide Web

Congress Ponders Differing Net-Neutrality Bills

Congress Ponders Differing Net-Neutrality Bills
May 9, 2008 1:37PM

Bookmark and Share
Congress is debating two bills with differing views for Internet neutrality. Rep. Edward Markey (D-MA) favors guidelines to set net-neutrality policies. But Reps. John Conyers (D-MI) and Rep. Zoe Lofgren (D-CA) want to use antitrust laws to ensure an open Internet. Public-interest groups applauded Conyers and Lofgren for pushing nondiscrimination.

APC has an established a reputation for solid products that virtually pay for themselves upon installation. Who has time to spend worrying about system downtime? APC makes it easy for you to focus on business growth instead of business downtime with reliable data center systems and IT solutions. Learn more here.

The Internet neutrality issue has once again taken center stage in Congress, where two bills are under scrutiny. During a hearing to discuss pending legislation, the chairman of the House Subcommittee on Telecommunications and the Internet noted that commercial success for many Internet-based companies depends on an open Internet.

"The question is whether, in the name of network management, policy-makers permit carriers to act in unreasonable, anticompetitive fashion," Rep. Edward Markey (D-MA) said. The choice before Congress is between permitting network operators "to fundamentally alter how the Internet has historically functioned," or retaining "a level playing field" that allows entrepreneurial entry, he explained.

The Antitrust Angle

The Internet Freedom Preservation Act co-sponsored by Markey and Rep. Chip Pickering (R-MS) establishes principles, rather than regulations, to guide policy in this area. "Then it requests an examination of the market and current practices, requires the FCC to hold several broadband summits around the country to solicit suggestions and opinion, and finally, tasks the FCC with reporting the results and any recommendations back to Congress," Markey said.

However, House Judiciary Committee Chairman John Conyers (D-MI) and Rep. Zoe Lofgren (D-CA) want a bill with more teeth. They are co-sponsoring a bill that builds upon the Clayton Antitrust Act of 1914, which expanded upon the pioneering Sherman Antitrust Act outlawing monopolies and cartels by prohibiting conduct considered harmful to consumers.

"The Internet was designed without centralized control, without gatekeepers for content and services," Conyers said in a statement reported by The New York Times. "If we allow companies with monopoly or duopoly power to control how the Internet operates, network providers could have the power to choose what content is available."

Opposing Views

Public-interest groups such as Free Press and Public Knowledge applauded Conyers and Lofgren for their commitment and leadership on what they perceive to be a critical issue. "The bill restores the principle of nondiscrimination that allowed the Internet to flourish in the dial-up era, making certain that the same freedom and innovation will flourish in the broadband era without burdensome regulation," said Gigi Sohn, president and cofounder of Public Knowledge.

However, Republican congressmen such as John Upton (R-MI) oppose. "We first heard about the issue over eight years ago and there is no solid evidence of consumers being blocked from any content or application on the web," Upton said. "And the very few times consumers have been troubled with something, the issue has been resolved without imposing regulations or legislation, indicating that market forces indeed work."

The National Cable & Telecommunications Association agrees. "There is zero evidence that any operator is engaging in anticompetitive conduct," said NCTA CEO Kyle McSlarrow. Though McSlarrow admitted that the methods currently used to regulate broadband traffic could be justifiably questioned, he denied the need for legislation on the matter. "I don't think we are at a stage where there is any market failure that justifies government intervention," he said.

Upton said he believes the proposed legislation would actually short-circuit the evolution of the Internet. "To meet the growing capacity demands of advanced Internet services and applications, carriers need the flexibility to experiment with different business models, as well as to manage network congestion and quality of service in the short term while they invest and innovate for the long term," Upton said.

Tell Us What You Think
Comment:

Name:



 World Wide Web
1. Heartbleed Exploit Could Cost Millions
2. 'Like' Cheerios, Give Up Right To Sue
3. Google Earnings, Sales Disappoint
4. Tech Giant Alibaba Plans U.S. IPO
5. Google Street View Unravels CAPTCHAs




 Most Popular Articles
1. BlackBerry Drops T-Mobile After Nasty Spat
2. Cisco, IBM Launch Internet of Things Consortium
3. Salesforce CRM Gets Industry Specific for Internet of Customers
4. Intel Bets on Cloudera for Big Data Analytics
5. SAP HANA Data Warehouse App Gets Faster Analytics

Have an informed opinion on this story?
Send a Letter to the Editor.
We want to know what you think.
Send us your Feedback.

 Related Topics  Latest News & Special Reports

  Galaxy S5 Phone: Less Can Be More
  Heartbleed Exploit Could Cost Millions
  Poll: A Mix of Feelings on Future Tech
  Google, Rockstar Suit Stays in Calif.
  Michaels: Nearly 3M Cards Breached

 Technology Marketplace

Business Intelligence
Get real-time, cloud-based information services with Neustar.
 
Cloud Computing
BMC's I.T. solutions unleash the power of your business
Next Generation Data Center Is Here! Vblock™ Systems from VCE
 
Contact Centers
HP delivers the future of the contact center with HP Qfiniti 10.
 
Data Storage
Next Generation Data Center Is Here! Vblock™ Systems from VCE
Barium Ferrite (BaFe) is the future of tape.
2.5" Enterprise-class SATA & SAS SSDs for server & storage applications
 
Enterprise Hardware
Barium Ferrite (BaFe) is the future of tape.
2.5" Enterprise-class SATA & SAS SSDs for server & storage applications
 
Enterprise I.T.
BMC's I.T. solutions unleash the power of your business
 
Hardware
Protect your network with APC Smart-UPS battery backup
 
Network Security
Protect your network with APC Smart-UPS battery backup
 

Network Security Spotlight
Heartbleed Could Cost Millions, Could Have Been Prevented
Early estimates of Heartbleed’s cost to enterprises are running in the millions. The reason: revoking all the SSL certificates the bug exposed will come at a very hefty price. Some say it all could have been avoided.
 
Michaels Says Nearly 3M Credit, Debit Cards Breached
Arts and crafts retail giant Michaels Stores has confirmed that a data breach at its POS terminals from May 2013 to Jan. 2014 may have exposed nearly 3 million customer credit and debit cards.
 
Google's Street View Software Unravels CAPTCHAs
The latest software Google uses for its Street View cars to read street numbers in images for Google Maps works so well that it also solves CAPTCHAs, those puzzles designed to defeat bots.
 

Enterprise Hardware Spotlight
Vaio Fit 11A Battery Danger Forces Recall by Sony
Using a Sony Vaio Fit 11A laptop? It's time to send it back to Sony. In fact, Sony is encouraging people to stop using the laptop after several reports of its Panasonic battery overheating.
 
Continued Drop in Global PC Shipments Slows
Worldwide shipments of PCs fell during the first three months of the year, but the global slump in PC demand may be easing, with a considerable slowdown from last year's drops.
 
Google Glass Finds a Home in Medical Education, Practice
The innovative headpiece may find its niche in markets where hands-free access to data can be a big advantage. Glass experiments for doctors are already under way, with some promising results.
 

Mobile Technology Spotlight
Review: Siri-Like Cortana Fills Windows Phone Gap
With the new Cortana virtual assistant, Windows catches up with Apple's iOS and Google's Android in a major way, taking some of the best parts of Apple's and Google's virtual assistants, with new tools too.
 
With Galaxy S5, Samsung Proves Less Can Be More
Samsung has produced the most formidable rival yet to the iPhone 5s: the Galaxy S5. The device is the fifth edition of the company's successful line of Galaxy S smartphones, and shows less can be more.
 
Facebook Rolls Out Potentially Intrusive Location-Sharing
Looking for friends? Facebook users in the U.S. will soon be able to see which of their friends are nearby, using a smartphone's GPS. Could be a cool feature in some cases, or way too much information.
 

Navigation
CIO Today
Home/Top News | Enterprise Software | Enterprise Hardware | Big Data | Network Security | Cloud Computing | CRM Systems
Data Storage | Operating Systems | Communications | CIO Issues | Mobile Tech | Chips & Processors | World Wide Web
Business Briefing | After Hours | Press Releases
Also visit these Enterprise Technology Sites
Top Tech News | CIO Today | Mobile Tech Today | Data Storage Today

Services:
FreeNewsFeed | Free Newsletters | XML/RSS Feed

About CIO Today Network | How To Contact Us | Article Reprints | Services for PR Pros (In partnership with NewsFactor) | Top Tech Wire | How To Advertise

Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
© Copyright 2000-2014 CIO Today. All rights reserved. Article rating technology by Blogowogo. Member of Accuserve Ad Network.