Taking a page from Samsung’s playbook, LG Electronics is rolling out tablets in multiple sizes. The Korea-based electronics maker on Monday announced that three new tablets are joining its G Pad series.

The company plans to take the lid off the G Pad 7.0, G Pad 8.0 and G Pad 10.1 at MedPI 2014 trade show in Monaco this week. Along with the G Pad 8.3, LG said it expects the new additions to its tablet portfolio to expand its footprint in a competitive market.

“Customers tell us that they want a wider range of devices that offer sizable screens without compromising portability,” said Jong-seok Park, president and CEO of the LG Electronics Mobile Communications Company. “Unlike smartphones, tablets are not one size fits all. So we designed the G Pad Series for a diverse target audience, some who prioritize portability while others want the best multimedia experience possible. G Pad delivers on all counts.”

Knock, Knock

Here’s a quick run down of the specs: LG designed the G Pad 7.0 to be held in one hand. It’s the company’s smallest tablet positioned as an on-the-go entertainment hub; the G Pad 8.0 is a mid-size tablet that promises an “immersive multimedia experience”; the G Pad 10.1 is also marketed as a device for entertainment-minded consumers.

All three tablets include LG’s proprietary user interface features, including QPair 2.0 and Knock Code. First introduced in the G Pad 8.3, an updated QPair lets users connect to their Android-powered smartphones via Bluetooth to receive notifications of calls and messages and respond directly from their G Pads.

Meanwhile, Knock Code lets users power on and unlock their devices by entering personalized “knock” patterns on the display. Knock Code intends to blend convenience with greater security Relevant Products/Services by allowing users to enter sequences of two to eight taps with more than 80,000 possible combinations. Availability will be announced in the coming weeks.

Is Different Better?

We caught up with Avi Greengart, an analyst at Current Analysis, to get his take on LG’s new tablet entrants. He told us LG has been slow to adopt smartphones, investing way too long in touchscreen feature phones -- but the company has been working overtime catch up in the last two years. Greengart also noted LG’s attention to adding hardware features, choosing better components, and offering innovative designs.

“The challenge now is getting consumers to treat LG with the same level of excitement and brand trust as they do Samsung,” Greengart said. “Samsung has a lot more advertising. Samsung has built its brand trust stronger than LG has. Samsung globally has better distribution than LG.”

Like any Android vendor, Greengart said, LG is building on an operating system Relevant Products/Services that everyone can access. LG’s challenge is standing out from the pack -- a challenge the company has not yet fully overcome.

“LG has put the power button on the back. That’s certainly unique,” he said. “It’s different. But it isn’t necessarily better.”