If you’ve always wanted your own pair of Google Glass wearables but were stalled, stymied and otherwise prevented from the glory of Glass because you weren’t a United States-based developer, tax-day could be your lucky day. Google is making Glass available to the masses on April 15 so more people can officially attain to Explorer status.

That’s right, Google Glass is on sale to anyone and everyone in the U.S. April 15 and only April 15. Of course, that may not be your only obstacle. The price tag is still steep at $1,500 per pair. But, hey, maybe you can pool resources with your friends and share a pair.

“Over the past several months, we’ve been trying out different ways to expand the Explorer program,” Google wrote on its Google Plus page. “Some of you signed up at Google I/O, some told us what you would do #ifihadglass, some were referred by a friend, some joined through their school or university.”

How to Get Glass Now

Google said its Explorers are moms, bakers, surgeons and rockers. The company said each of its Explorers have delivered new perspectives that are ultimately helping make Glass better. Still, Google keeps getting requests from people who want to be Explorers but haven’t found the open door.

In a move to get more feedback, Google decided to open some spots in the Glass Explorer program. Essentially, any adult in the U.S. can become an Explorer. Here’s how it works: Just visit the Google.com/glass/start/how-to-get-one/ and pay your $1,500, plus tax. As a bonus, you’ll get your choice of shades or frames.

Google didn’t completely open up the floodgates. You need to be at least 18 years old. You need a U.S. shipping address. And the number of spots is still limited, though Google didn’t spill how many spots were ultimately available.

Creating Urgency

You would think there would be dancing in the streets, but many commenters on the Google Plus post are still complaining about the price. Matt Conn, for one, wrote: “Still $1500?! You're kidding me right -- Sony and Facebook are making major moves, Apple is right around the corner, and you're not making this a loss leader? Wisen up Google -- drop it to sub 1K at least.”

We caught up with Greg Sterling, principal analyst at Sterling Market Intelligence, to get his take on the expanded Google Glass Explorer Program. He told us Google is trying to generate broader interest and adoption of Glass by making it available to anyone who wants it but paradoxically limiting availability to a single day -- to create urgency and scarcity.

“It will really be a test of demand,” Sterling said. “I suspect there will be a rush but Glass remains a ‘geeky’ product that the majority of U.S. adults are not currently interested in," he said.