With 1 billion users and just 250 million "consistent" users, Twitter has been dealing with some major dilemmas in its user base. To attain more consistent users instead of inactive ones, Twitter is updating a large portion of its interface, especially its mobile app on iOS.

One of the most obvious changes will be removing the Home, Connect, Discover, and Me tabs. Instead of those, Twitter will be including a simplified swipe-navigation layout, allowing people to see different types of content.

Emphasis On Multimedia

Reports coming from people familiar with Twitter's new iOS app have stated that the application will be more focused on multimedia. Since pictures and videos are what keep people on the app longer, streams of content dedicated to media will likely be appearing in the update.

Regular text-based tweets will still appear but separate streams for media tweets will be offered. Among these new streams will be photo-only, interaction/conversation, and TV-related feeds.

In-line display of photos will also be included, allowing people to view multimedia content without actually opening a tweet.

This update is supposedly meant to attract people who are not technology savvy as well. Plus, this update (if comes to fruition) should be released to mobile devices before Twitter's initial public offering. Twitter's COO Ali Rowghani acknowledged the current issues with the service during a recent interview, stating "[Twitter] is not delivering the product as we should."

Impending IPO

Twitter is incredibly lucky as it has been able to navigate the road to an IPO without making the same mistakes that Facebook made. In 2011, Facebook ignited a trend of tech IPOs, many of which seem to have been bad decisions.

However, analysts do not seem to think that the Twitter IPO will be bad, in fact, it may be stunning for the social network. Twitter may end up being valued at $10 billion and, as a result, would raise millions of dollars because of the IPO.

Twitter announced its plan to go public yesterday on, you guessed it, Twitter. Even though we know an IPO is in the works, it does not appear as though Twitter will be very public with its plans.

This may end up being a great decision, as massive amounts of public attention regarding the Facebook IPO was part of the reason that it did not go as planned. Since Twitter has revenue below $1 billion, it is able to file with the Securities and Exchange Commission confidentially.

The law allowing Twitter to keep things under wraps and away from the public is President Barack Obama's JOBS act that went into effect last year. The law lets Twitter keep its IPO paperwork away from the public until 21 days before the actual IPO date.