Even though Windows 8.1 has yet to be released, rumors regarding Microsoft's coming Windows 9 and 10 are already emerging. A Russian forum user named WZOR provided speculative reports as to what Windows 9 and 10 will be like, as well as how they will differ from the current version of Windows.

Virtually everything that WZOR talked about cannot be proven, but according to numerous articles regarding the information, WZOR has been behind countless other Microsoft leaks. With an impressive track record, it makes sense that many journalists are paying attention to what WZOR has to say about the coming Windows operating systems.

Big Changes with Windows 10

According to WZOR, Windows 9 will be released next year but will not be significantly different from the version of Windows. The only specific information provided regarding Windows 9 was that it should bring back the Aero look, which was lost in Windows 8.

With so few changes expected in Windows 9, WZOR's information on Windows 10 is far more interesting. The anonymous user said it would be a "cloud Relevant Products/Services OS," which means that Microsoft would handle all the actual computing Relevant Products/Services on its servers and your computer would simply receive the information from Microsoft's servers. We have seen this type of technology gaining traction in terms of video games, with the Nvidia Shield, but nothing as significant as the cloud OS features proposed for Windows 10.

Cloud technology is already up and running successfully but turning it into a viable wide-release product is more difficult. Microsoft -- of all companies -- would likely be able to pull it off but at the end of the day, WZOR did mention that his information came from a third-party therefore, this information should be taken with a grain of salt.

The Amazing Cloud

If WZOR ends up being correct, and Windows 10 does come as a "cloud OS", the entire market could be flipped upside down. PC manufacturers would actually have a hard time staying alive if Microsoft decided to make a cloud OS simply because people would only need a very basic computer to run all of their applications.

With all of the major processing completed on Microsoft's end, consumers would only need a way to see the information (a monitor Relevant Products/Services) along with a mouse, keyboard, etc. Other than that, Windows and most of the other applications would be streamed to computers rather than processed on-site.

Cloud technology is definitely going to be a major part of the industry at least over the next five years, so it is possible Microsoft would make the jump to a cloud OS. With Nvidia capable of making a product that streams games, and Parallels coming out with a new remote Relevant Products/Services-access application, we are already seeing a shift toward off-site processing. Whether or not that will expand to include entire operating systems has yet to be seen.